Wednesday, April 13, 2022

pick up your pace of play

 Save your chatter for when you're walking to your balls, and not when you're readying to him them.

GETTY IMAGES

“Ipaid good money for this round. I don’t want to rush.”

So goes the truculent retort of countless slowpoke golfers when asked if they might, please, pick up the pace. Aside from signaling self-absorption (the people you’re holding up paid good money, too), the reply speaks to a common misperception: getting through a round with reasonable dispatch does not require shifting into hyper-drive.

Lucius Riccio is the author of “Golf’s Pace of Play Bible,” founder of the Three/45 Golf Association (yep, 3 hours and 45 minutes is the goal) and chief analytics officer of FairwayIQ. Though he’s quick to point out that glacial play is largely a function of poor management decisions (such as jammed-together tee times and ill-considered course setups), he says that everyday golfers can be culpable, too.

a turtle and golf ball sitting in grass
Does slow play cause higher scores? This data suggests it might
BY: ZEPHYR MELTON

What are the remedies for those who don’t like feeling “rushed”? 
Here are 6 simple ways to get a move on without having to huff and puff.

1. Hold the punchline

Stop us if you’ve heard this one before: guy on the tee sets down his stogie and pauses, mid-waggle, to recount his favorite shaggy-dog tale. Not only is he doing a bad Norm MacDonald, but he’s also bogging down your progress.

Three minutes is the maximum it should take to clear the tee, Riccio says (same goes for greens and fairways). In short, save the side-splitting yarns until everyone has hit.



6 ways to pick up your pace of play without feeling rushed

Save your chatter for when you're walking to your balls, and not when you're readying to him them.

GETTY IMAGES

“Ipaid good money for this round. I don’t want to rush.”

So goes the truculent retort of countless slowpoke golfers when asked if they might, please, pick up the pace. Aside from signaling self-absorption (the people you’re holding up paid good money, too), the reply speaks to a common misperception: getting through a round with reasonable dispatch does not require shifting into hyper-drive.

Lucius Riccio is the author of “Golf’s Pace of Play Bible,” founder of the Three/45 Golf Association (yep, 3 hours and 45 minutes is the goal) and chief analytics officer of FairwayIQ. Though he’s quick to point out that glacial play is largely a function of poor management decisions (such as jammed-together tee times and ill-considered course setups), he says that everyday golfers can be culpable, too.

a turtle and golf ball sitting in grass
Does slow play cause higher scores? This data suggests it might
BY: ZEPHYR MELTON

What are the remedies for those who don’t like feeling “rushed”? 
Here are 6 simple ways to get a move on without having to huff and puff.

1. Hold the punchline

Stop us if you’ve heard this one before: guy on the tee sets down his stogie and pauses, mid-waggle, to recount his favorite shaggy-dog tale. Not only is he doing a bad Norm MacDonald, but he’s also bogging down your progress.

Three minutes is the maximum it should take to clear the tee, Riccio says (same goes for greens and fairways). In short, save the side-splitting yarns until everyone has hit.

2. Wave up the group behind you

Granted, it can feel counterproductive when you’ve got an eightsome gathered on a green. But, Riccio says, the time you wait for the group behind you is often made up on the next hole because the fairway ahead has had a chance to clear when you get to the tee.

Waving up on all par-3s can shorten an 18-hole round by up to 10 to 20 minutes, Riccio says.

3. Don’t spectate, play

Golfer waiting on tee
Rules Guy: Is it permissible to play holes out of order to avoid a slow group?
BY: RULES GUY

The passenger seat of a cart is not a place to camp out and watch your partner. While they’re playing, grab a club or two, stroll to your ball and find your yardage. This is not rushing. It’s called getting ready. It should not take more than 45 seconds to play a shot.

4. Walk this way

The average walking pace for men ages 60-69 is roughly 3 miles per hour. You can walk as briskly as a 69-year-old man. That translates to covering about 100 yards per minute.

5. Avoid large search parties

When it comes to looking for a lost ball, four’s a crowd, Riccio says. A three-person search party is as big as it should get, and if you’re not searching, don’t just gawk from afar — go play your own ball.

6. Check your ego in the parking lot

Golf is hard. Playing too much golf course makes it harder still. How do you know if you’ve bitten off too much? Subtract your handicap index from the slope, Riccio says. If that number is greater than 142, you’re in too deep. Play it forward!

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An inside look at Champions Retreat, host of the ANWA's first two rounds

Nicklaus. Palmer. Player. Three of the world's greatest golfers share their course designs on one piece of property in Evans, GA. Even beyond the golf, GOLF's Emily Haas and Claire Rogers found the entire Champions Retreat experience is a great one.

Pinehurst Wheel of Courses

Pinehurst Resort features ten courses, led by World Top 100 and U.S. Open host, Pinehurst No. 2. With so many courses and so little time, our team spun the Wheel of Courses to decide which 18 to play. It's Pinehurst like you've never seen it before.

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GOLF.COM

A golf, food and travel writer, Josh Sens has been a GOLF Magazine contributor since 2004 and now contributes across all of GOLF’s platforms. His work has been anthologized in The Best American Sportswriting. He is also the co-author, with Sammy Hagar, of Are We Having Any Fun Yet: the Cooking and Partying Handbook.

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artworks to see in Venice

 


Ten essential artworks to see in Venice

In their new and bold visual style, Venetian School artists discarded Florence’s obsession with form in favour of rich colours, greater dynamism and unparalleled sumptuousness. Works by Bellini, Giorgione, Tintoretto, Titian and Veronese are intrinsic products of the city: they seem to coarse with the hedonism, commercial energy and grandeur of the Renaissance republic. Today, the paintings and frescoes line the walls of busy museums and quiet churches tucked away along thoroughfares throbbing with tourists. Other spaces in the city display important collections of Modern art. Whether you are visiting for the Biennale or simply for a weekend break, our list will guide you through Venice's vast and diverse artistic heritage.

Bellini's San Zaccaria altarpiece (1505), church of San Zaccaria

Bellini_San Zaccaria_ Credits Web Gallery of Art

Placed above the altar on a wall packed with baroque paintings, Bellini’s sumptuous masterpiece immediately grabs your attention. In this “sacra conversione”—a genre in which Madonna and child are presented alongside assorted saints from various eras—the artist exhibits his adherence to Giorgione’s rich, moody colours, with lavish blue and yellow robes for Peter and glorious red for Jerome. The 74-year-old Bellini painted the scene in a niche framed by flanking columns. By ingeniously integrating the actual columns into a perfectly depicted chapel in the painting, he makes the work feel as though it is opening up from the architecture itself.

Tintoretto’s Crucifixion (1565) at the Scuola Grande di San Rocco

Tintoretto’s Crucifixion (1565)

The charitable San Rocco confraternity, a wealthy group of Venetian citizens, constructed the Scuola Grande as their seat.Tintoretto adorned the gilded interior with 60 works depicting scenes from the Old and New testaments over a period of two decades. The result is a breathtakingly abundant offering that stands as Venice’s biggest pictorial cycle. You are unlikely to miss the awesome Crucifixion, arguably Tintoretto’s finest work. The huge canvas teems with despairing throngs, gathered at the foot of the cross to the backdrop of a thundering sky.

Gustav Klimt’s Judith II (1909), International Gallery of Modern Art, Palazzo Ca’ Pesaro

Gustav Klimt, Judith II (1909)

According to the bible, Judith decapitated General Holofernes to save her city, Bethulia, from destruction. Klimt first depicted the figure in 1901, returning to the subject eight years later in this riot of contrasting colours. Imbued with a sense of dynamism reminiscent of Salome’s Dance of the Seven Veils, the work was acquired by the city of Venice after the 1910 Biennale. It now hangs in the Gallery of Modern Art on the first two floors of Ca’ Pesaro, once home to the powerful local family that produced a 17th-century Doge. The third floor of the palace hosts the Museum of Oriental Art.

Pala d’Oro (10th-13th century), Saint Mark’s Basilica

Pala d'Oro, Saint Mark's Basilica, Venice

Nicknamed the “Chiesa d’Oro” (“Church of Gold”), Saint Mark’s Basilica is one of the world's finest examples of Italo-Byzantine architecture. Its 8,000 sq. m expanse of dazzling mosaics—created by the likes of Veronese, Tintoretto and Titian, and sometimes by using 24-carat gold leaf—understandably draws more visitors than any other Venice landmark. Commissioned by Doge Pietro I Orseolo in 976 and extended thereafter, the lavish Pala d’Oro altar contains enamels taken from Constantinople following the Fourth Crusade. The golden structure incorporates 1,300 pearls, 300 sapphires, 300 emeralds, and garnets, amethysts, rubies, spinels and topazes.

Giorgione’s La Tempesta (around 1505), Gallerie dell’ Accademia

Giorgione, La Tempesta (around 1505)

This work is not only one of the world’s first landscapes; it is also the most mysterious painting in Venice. Giorgione moodily depicts a green and turquoise countryside illuminated by a burst of lightning. The man to the left has been variously identified as a shepherd and a soldier, while the nude woman suckling a child is sometimes described as a gypsy. Whether the work represents a socio-political allegory, a symbolic narrative or pure fantasy depends on who you ask. It is displayed at the Gallerie dell’Accademia, a temple to Venetian School artists including Bellini, Tintoretto and Titian.

Veronese’s Madonna in Glory with St Sebastian (1572), Church of San Sebastiano

Veronese, Madonna in Glory with St Sebastian (1572)

The sober Renaissance fa├žade of the church of San Sebastiano hides a trove of works from Veronese’s mature period. Depicting scenes from the saint's life, the artist's cycle of frescoes and paintings extends across walls, ceilings and panels in the organ loft. The Madonna in Glory with St Sebastian, which was beautifully restored in 2017 along with the church's other works by the non-profit organisation Save Venice, takes pride of place above the church’s altar. Veronese worked on the paintings for over 20 years and is buried in the church.

Tiepolo’s Neptune Offering Gifts to Venice (around 1758), Doge’s Palace

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, Neptune Offering Gifts to Venice (around 1758)

In the Doge’s majestic seat of power, the gilded Sala delle quattro porte linked the four principal organs of government (the Sala del Collegio, Sala del Senato, Sala del Consiglio dei Died and Sala dei Tre Capi). Commissioned to replace a fading Tintoretto fresco, Tiepolo’s allegory extols Venice’s wealth and domination of the sea. Venice is depicted as a beautiful Queen leaning on a lion of St Mark. Neptune, god of the sea, offers her gifts from a cornucopia overflowing with coins, coral and pearls.

Jackson Pollock’s The Moon Woman (1942), Peggy Guggenheim Collection

The Peggy Guggenheim Collection houses Jackson Pollock'sThe Moon Woman (1942)

In addition to its museums in New York and Bilbao, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation also manages the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, displayed in the heiress’s former Venice home. The 20th-century collection of Cubist, Surrealist and Abstract Expressionist works includes a number of Jackson Pollocks that fill an entire room. Clearly inspired by Picasso, whose works had shown at MoMA in 1939, Moon Woman depicts a garishly coloured, voluptuous creature with colourful folds of skin wrapped around a jet black spine.

Titian’s Pesaro Madonna (1519-26), Basilica of Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari

Titian, Pesaro Madonna (1519-26)

Titian depicts his patron Jacopo Pesaro, then Bishop of Paphos in Cyprus, as kneeling at the feet of the Madonna alongside members of his family, saints, a knight, two prisoners and a turbaned Turk. The artist broke with the tradition of placing devotional figures at the centre of the composition to permit a stronger sense of movement. Continue your Pesaro pilgrimage by checking out the three family tombs in the basilica (containing the remains of Jacopo Pesaro, Doge Giovanni Pesaro and general Benedetto Pesaro). Composer Claudio Monteverdi, Titian and Canova’s heart are also entombed here.

Canova’s Daedalus and Icarus (1779), Museo Correr

Antonio Canova, Daedalus and Icarus (1779)

Overlooking Piazza San Marco, the Museo Correr is housed in parts of the Procuratie Nuove, completed in the 17th century, and the Procuratie Nuovissimi, constructed by Napoleon following the demise of the Republic at the start of the 19th century. On display is Canova’s first marble sculpture, which shows an elderly Daedalus, his body shrivelled with age, attaching wax wings to the back of his son, Icarus. The museum also contains works by Antonello da Messina, Carpaccio and Bellini, as well as maps, architectural designs and models illustrating the history of Venice.